Saturday, July 31, 2010

Brian’s Reflection: The Weekend, Sat, July 31, 2010



"The farm of a certain rich man produced a terrific crop. He talked to himself:
'What can I do? My barn isn't big enough for this harvest.' Then he said, 'Here's
what I'll do: I'll tear down my barns and build bigger ones. Then I'll gather in all
my grain and goods, and I'll say to myself, Self, you've done well! You've got it
made and can now retire. Take it easy and have the time of your life!' "Just then
God showed up and said, 'Fool! Tonight you die. And your barnful of goods—
who gets it?' "That's what happens when you fill your barn with Self and not
with God."


The Gospel called “Luke” 12 [the Gospel reading for this Sunday,
Aug 1 – RCL; The Message]


Here’s a story about we human beings getting stuck in a severely flawed , diminished understanding of ourselves, of who we “are”. Dr. Peterson is a mystical master; I think this is why I read his version of the Scriptures so avidly . He understands the “hidden” meaning of this story. Look what he says at the end, in complete understanding of what this parable is about; “"That's what happens when you fill your barn with Self and not with God." This is not a story about hoarding material things; it’s a story about not recognizing the true Mystery of our human nature: our Oneness with all things, including what we call the Divine Soul of the Universe.

So: Jesus responds to the man who asked him to be a judge and get his brother to give him his part of the inheritance. He intended the story to be a kick in the pants! He in effect says to the man, “Stop wallowing in such a limited view of who you Are! Stop spending all your energy seeing Life as a contest of accumulating “stuff” that doesn’t enlarge your Humanity. Step into the Mystery of your Oneness with “God” and All Things. Then you’ll really be rich.”

Staying stuck in an impoverished Humanity is Death.

Choose Life.

Brian+

1 comment:

張陳俊凱柏 said...

生存乃是不斷地在內心與靈魂交戰;寫作是坐著審判自己。. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .